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Andrew Jackson “Jack” ROBERTSON b. 6 Aug 1854 Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory d. 12 Feb 1934 Tahlequah, Cherokee Co., Oklahoma: Wade Prater Genealogy Online
 
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Andrew Jackson “Jack” ROBERTSON

Male 1854 - 1934  (79 years)


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  • Name Andrew Jackson “Jack” ROBERTSON 
    Born 6 Aug 1854  Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 12 Feb 1934  Tahlequah, Cherokee Co., Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Tahlequah City Cemetery, Tahlequah, Cherokee Co., Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I260  Main
    Last Modified 2 Oct 2019 

    Father Coleman Ratliff ROBERTSON, Sr.,   b. 12 Aug 1824, -----, -----, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Oct 1886, Muskogee, Creek Nation, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years) 
    Mother Nancy TERRELL,   b. Abt 1827, Chestatee River, Cherokee Nation East (Georgia) Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Apr 1859, Ketcher Town, Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 32 years) 
    Family ID F56  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Ellen Jane JOHNSON,   b. 14 Sep 1860, near Montgomery, Fannin Co., Georgia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Jul 1940, Pawhuska, Osage Co., Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years) 
    Married 12 Jun 1878  Fort Gibson, Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Lillie May ROBERTSON,   b. 23 May 1880, Muskogee, Creek Nation, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Jul 1946, Tulsa, Tulsa Co., Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
     2. Andrew Joseph ROBERTSON,   b. 10 Mar 1882, Muskogee, Creek Nation, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Feb 1883, Muskogee, Creek Nation, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     3. A. ROBERTSON,   b. 10 Jan 1885,   d. 10 Jan 1885  (Age 0 years)
     4. William Wallace ROBERTSON,   b. 23 Feb 1886,   d. 10 Dec 1886  (Age 0 years)
     5. Jennie ROBERTSON,   b. 10 Jan 1888,   d. 11 Jan 1888  (Age 0 years)
    +6. Biddy Allie ROBERTSON,   b. 24 Feb 1889, Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Apr 1934, Tahlequah, Cherokee Co., Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 45 years)
    +7. Nellie ROBERTSON,   b. 20 Feb 1893, Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Nov 1974, Pawhuska, Osage Co., Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)
    +8. Fannie ROBERTSON,   b. 29 Aug 1895, Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Oct 1913, South Coffeyville, Nowata Co., Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 18 years)
    +9. Nancy ROBERTSON,   b. 2 Apr 1898, Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Apr 1932, Tahlequah, Cherokee Co., Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 34 years)
    +10. George Anna ROBERTSON,   b. 20 Jul 1902, Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Oct 1940, Tulsa, Tulsa Co., Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 38 years)
    Last Modified 2 Oct 2019 
    Family ID F247  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Andrew Jackson Robertson.
    Andrew Jackson Robertson.
    Andrew Jackson & Ellen Jane (Johnson) Robertson Family.
    Andrew Jackson & Ellen Jane (Johnson) Robertson Family.
    Jack Robertson and his cabbages.
    Jack Robertson and his cabbages.
    Jack and Ellen (Johnson) Robertson.
    Jack and Ellen (Johnson) Robertson.
    George W. Robertson visit to Tahlequah.
    George W. Robertson visit to Tahlequah.
    Left to Right:
    Ellen and George Neely in back.
    Harve Neely, Allie (Robertson) Neely, Jack Robertson, George Robertson.
    Leroy, Sequoyah, Lucien Neely in front.
    Jack Robertson.
    Jack Robertson.

    Documents
    Andrew Jackson Robertson Family Bible.
Page 1.
    Andrew Jackson Robertson Family Bible. Page 1.
    In the possession of his grandson Norman Wayne Crowe, Tulsa, Oklahoma, in the 1980s.
    Andrew Jackson Robertson Family Bible.
Page 2.
    Andrew Jackson Robertson Family Bible. Page 2.
    In the possession of his grandson Norman Wayne Crowe, Tulsa, Oklahoma, in the 1980s.
    Andrew Jackson Robertson Family Bible.
Page 3.
    Andrew Jackson Robertson Family Bible. Page 3.
    In the possession of his grandson Norman Wayne Crowe, Tulsa, Oklahoma, in the 1980s.
    Andrew Jackson Robertson Family Bible.
Page 4.
    Andrew Jackson Robertson Family Bible. Page 4.
    In the possession of his grandson Norman Wayne Crowe, Tulsa, Oklahoma, in the 1980s.
    Article re: Andrew Jackson Robertson.
    Article re: Andrew Jackson Robertson.
    Obituary of Andrew Jackson Robertson.
    Obituary of Andrew Jackson Robertson.
    Obituary of Andrew Jackson Robertson.
    Obituary of Andrew Jackson Robertson.
    The Village Blacksmiths Advertisement.
    The Village Blacksmiths Advertisement.
    From the Indian Journal, Muskogee, Indian Territory, February 27, 1879.
    Coleman R. Robertson and son Andrew Jackson Robertson, proprietors.
    The Village Blacksmith & Woodshop.
    The Village Blacksmith & Woodshop.
    From Our Brother in Red, Muskogee, Indian Territory, December 1, 1883. Coleman R. Robertson and Andrew Jackson Robertson, proprietors.

  • Notes 
    • Jack Robertson was raised by his aunt Rachel Terrell in the area southwest of Tahlequah later known as “Metory.” When his father Coleman returned from Kentucky in 1877, he and Jack went into the blacksmith business together in Muskogee. In about 1885, Jack Robertson and family moved back to the Tahlequah area. The following biography gives more details on the life of Jack Robertson:

      A.J. ROBERTSON

      Today brings back to us thoughts of the late A.J. Robertson. Who, had he lived would have been 80 years old this August 6,1934.
      Mr. Robertson was a quarter blood Cherokee. He was born near Ft. Gibson August 6th, in 1854. Mr. Robertson was motherless from the age of seven. The only mother he knew was his aunt Miss Rachel Terrell; and she surely did not neglect her job. For, tho he had no opportunity to go to school, he had that in him that refused to be common. As he grew older he saw the need of an education. He had no chance to go to school there for he was working at the carpenter trade and brick making. He was working in the brick yard at the age of 15 yrs. It was his honest hands that helped mould the brick that went into the Cherokee Capitol, now the Cherokee County Courthouse. All this time he realized more and more the need of an education.
      In 1877 he moved to Muskogee and went into a blacksmith shop with his father. And then on June 12, 1878, he married Ellen J. Johnson of Ft. Gibson making their home in Muskogee. At that time Muskogee could boast of one general store owned by J.A. Patterson, one livery stable owned by John Cobb, a restaurant, the M. K. & T. depot, one hardware owned by J.E. Turner and the blacksmith shop owned by Robertson & Robertson.
      It was here Mr. Robertson conceived the idea of self-education. He purchased books and at night began the task of learning. His wife would help him and in this way he learned more than a lot of boys learn in the best colleges.
      Mr. Robertson had professed the Christian faith and joined the methodist Church in Jan. of 1880, and he soon felt the need of some sort of a place where one could go and worship God. The Sunday school he organized was the first step and also the first Sunday school in Muskogee.
      Mr. Robertson watched both Muskogee and Tahlequah grow from a dark speck on the prairie and the hills to thriving cities. Saw the building of the Male and Female Seminary at Tahlequah, and those buildings gave few people more pleasure than Mr. Robertson for he realized that the children of the day could so easily acquire an education.
      Mr. Robertson was always a leader and soon the quality that made of him a leader among men was recognized and he was elected to the city council of Tahlequah, where he had been living since 1885, and also a member of the Old Settlers Council and served until a claim was put through the courts granting a payment of money to the old Cherokee settlers. He was also elected to the Cherokee National Council and served two years, and during that time introduced the bill to create a committee to enter an agreement with the government of the United States.
      In 1900 Mr. Robertson moved to Manard close to old Ft. Gibson. The place was wild and wooly and a hangout for an out-law who called himself the Wooly Wolf. But, Mr. Robertson feared no outlaw. But, felt instead that there should be a Sunday school in every community where outlaw and saint alike could gather. So he organized a Sunday School in a little log cabin on the bayou. Advertised by word of mouth that he would hold an ice cream social at the Bayou school house. The proceeds to go for Sunday school literature. The crowd came, and so did the Wooly Wolf and his pack. The audience dispersed in fear and trembling. That is all but Mr. Robertson and his close friend Frank Coleman who stayed and out talked the band of outlaws.
      Then in 1906, Mr. Robertson and his family moved to the country and put up a store and petitioned the government for a post office. This was granted and Mrs. Robertson was appointed post mistress at Metory, that being the name chosen for the office. Mail was received at Metory only three days a week.* Mr. Robertson, who operated a blacksmith shop, would close it and go carry the mail from Tahlequah to Metory. The post office discontinued after eight years and he returned to his beloved Tahlequah because of ill health and spent the remainder of his life there. He passed away at the age of 79 years at the home of his daughter Mrs. Allie Neely.
      [*Error. Mail was delivered daily to the Metory post office after the first six months of operation of the office. --Wayne Crowe.]

      Pioneer Recalls His Work
      On Cherokee Council House.

      Andrew J. Robertson, 75,
      Aided in Building First Capitol.

      Special Dispatch to The World.
      TAHLEQUAH, Sept. 24--Among the few persons now living who assisted in the erection of the first brick capitol building in old Indian Territory is Andrew J. Robertson, who during a number of years conducted wagon-making, wood-working and blacksmithing establishments in Tahlequah. The capitol building in question was that authorized by act of the Cherokee national council in the fall of 1867, and which is now the Cherokee county courthouse.
      Many persons were given employment by the contractors and Robertson, a youth, was among those on the pay roll. He recalls that the grassy square surrounding the building bore a much different appearance in earlier days, there being many large forest trees which were old when the first council was held in 1839. During past years all the big trees with one exception have been removed.
      Robertson, who attained his seventy-fifth birthday recently, recalls the personal appearance and actions of many of the notable characters of the later sixties, seventies and eighties of the last century, among them councilmen, chiefs and other officials, and was acquainted with many of the pioneers who remembered the founding of Tahlequah in the days of 1839.
      The walls of the capitol were finished in 1870, but it was not until somewhat later that the interior rooms and legislative halls were completed.

      STROKE IS FATAL TO “UNCLE JACK” ROBERTSON
      WELL-KNOWN MUSKOGEE AND TAHLEQUAH PIONEER

      Was 79 Years Old, Born Near Fort Gibson
      Helped Build Cherokee Capital

      Andrew Jackson (“Uncle Jack”) Robertson, who spent the entire 79 years of his life in and near the Cherokee strip, died Monday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. H.A. Neeley.
      “Uncle Jack” had been in failing health for several months, but was apparently gaining in strength and had been able to enjoy a good noonday lunch on the day of his death. He live but two hours after the fatal stroke.
      Mr. Robertson was born near Fort Gibson on August 6, 1854, his parents being Mr. and Mrs. Coleman Robertson. On June 12, 1878, he was married to Miss Ellen J. Johnson at Fort Gibson, who survives him. After their marriage they lived near Muskogee for about five years, thence moving to the vicinity of Tahlequah.
      Mr. Robertson was a blacksmith by trade. He was active in church and community work all his life, having organized a Sunday school at Muskogee which later developed into the Methodist church there, with over a thousand members now succeeding the group of ten with which he formed the Sunday School. He was superintendent of the Woodall Sunday School for a number of years, and was esteemed as a man of exemplary character, thoughtful and considerate of the rights of others. He was awarded a medal for faithful Sunday school work, which he wore constantly.
      He helped make the bricks and construct the old Cherokee Capital building, now the Cherokee county courthouse.
      Four daughters are living: Mrs. Lillie Ritchson, Claremore; Mrs. Nellie Crowe, Pawhuska; Mrs. George Ann Anthony, Sand Springs, and Mrs. H.A. Neeley of this city. Three daughters and five sons have passed away. Two sisters and one brother also survive: Mrs. Elija Kelley, Muskogee; Mrs. W.Z.A. Wright, Portland, Oregon, and George Robertson, Kansas City, Kansas.
      Twenty-two grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren also mourn his loss.
      Funeral services were held from the Neeley home Wednesday afternoon, February 12, Rev. T.O. Shanks officiating. Mrs. Dannenberg and Mrs. Austin Neeley sang a favorite hymn, “A Rock Amid the Waves,” other music being rendered by the Methodist choir.
      Pallbearers were: Buff Wyly, Bennett Thompson, J.T. Cunningham, Charley Molloy, Will Ghormley and Walt Duncan. Interment was in the city cemetery.
      Relatives from out of town who attended the funeral were: George Robertson of Kansas City, Kansas; Mrs. Jennie Kelley of Muskogee; Mrs. George Ann Anthony and Jackie Blake Anthony of Sand Springs; Fred Gladd of Fort Gibson and Clifford Haines of Choteau.”