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Andreas NISSEN LEERSKOV b. 22 Oct 1829 Bæk, Vonsbæk Sogn, Haderslev Amt, Danmark d. 13 Nov 1907 Minneapolis, Hennepin Co., Minnesota: Wade Prater Genealogy Online
 
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Andreas NISSEN LEERSKOV

Male 1829 - 1907  (78 years)


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  • Name Andreas NISSEN LEERSKOV 
    Born 22 Oct 1829  Bæk, Vonsbæk Sogn, Haderslev Amt, Danmark Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 13 Nov 1907  Minneapolis, Hennepin Co., Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin Co., Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I3  Main
    Last Modified 24 Feb 2020 

    Father Nis LEERSKOV,   b. 1 Oct 1788, Bæk, Vonsbæk Sogn, Haderslev Amt, Danmark Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Apr 1842, Bæk, Vonsbæk Sogn, Haderslev Amt, Danmark Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 53 years) 
    Mother Anna LUNDBECK,   b. 23 Aug 1800, Ødis, Vejle Amt, Danmark Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Mar 1885, Lindet, Skœrup Sogn, Vejle Amt, Danmark Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years) 
    Family ID F3  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Marie Kirstine HOLLESEN,   b. 2 Aug 1845, Stevelt, Øsby Sogn, Haderslev Amt, Danmark Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Aug 1916, Cottage Grove, Washington Co., Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Married 18 Jan 1861  Haderslev, Haderslev Amt, Danmark Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Detlev Wilhelm NISSEN LEERSKOV,   b. 6 May 1861, Flovt, Øsby Sogn, Haderslev Amt, Danmark Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jan 1928, Tahlequah, Cherokee Co., Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
    +2. Niels NISSEN LEERSKOV,   b. 1 Jan 1864, Flovt, Øsby Sogn, Haderslev Amt, Danmark Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Sep 1950, Rochester, Olmsted Co., Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years)
     3. Andrea Wilhelmine NISSEN LEERSKOV,   b. 10 Jun 1867, Flovt, Øsby Sogn, Haderslev Amt, Danmark (then in Preußen, Deutschland) Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Jul 1868, Flovt, Øsby Sogn, Haderslev Amt, Danmark (then in Preußen, Deutschland) Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 1 years)
    +4. Ane Kirstine Wilhelmine “Minnie” NISSEN LEERSKOV,   b. 8 May 1870, Flovt, Øsby Sogn, Haderslev Amt, Danmark (then in Preußen, Deutschland) Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Nov 1941, Rochester, Olmsted Co., Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
    +5. Søren “Sam” NISSEN LEERSKOV,   b. 13 Feb 1873, Flovt, Øsby Sogn, Haderslev Amt, Danmark (then in Preußen, Deutschland) Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Jan 1913, Brush, Morgan Co., Colorado Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 39 years)
     6. un-named female NISSEN LEERSKOV,   b. 31 May 1876, Flovt, Øsby Sogn, Haderslev Amt, Danmark (then in Preußen, Deutschland) Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 May 1876, Flovt, Øsby Sogn, Haderslev Amt, Danmark (then in Preußen, Deutschland) Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    +7. Kirstine “Christine” NISSEN LEERSKOV,   b. 22 May 1877, Flovt, Øsby Sogn, Haderslev Amt, Danmark (then in Preußen, Deutschland) Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Feb 1948, Minneapolis, Hennepin Co., Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years)
     8. Anna Marie NISSEN LEERSKOV,   b. 24 Dec 1881, Løsning, Løsning Sogn, Vejle Amt, Danmark Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Jul 1904, Minneapolis, Hennepin Co., Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 22 years)
    Last Modified 24 Feb 2020 
    Family ID F2  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Andreas Nissen Leerskov & Marie Kirstine Hollesen.
    Andreas Nissen Leerskov & Marie Kirstine Hollesen.
    From the collection of Eileen (Leerskov) Ferree.

    Documents
    Obituary of Andreas N. Leerskov.
    Obituary of Andreas N. Leerskov.
    Death Certificate of Andreas N. Leerskov.
    Death Certificate of Andreas N. Leerskov.

    Headstones
    Grave marker of Andreas Nissen Leerskov and Marie Kirstine Hollesen.
    Grave marker of Andreas Nissen Leerskov and Marie Kirstine Hollesen.
    Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery (formerly Layman's Cemetery), Minneapolis, Minnesota.

  • Notes 
    • FLOVT, SLESVIG: 1860-1879

      “Andreas was a tall, very fine looking man, with sea-blue eyes and light curling hair. Marie was a small woman, about five feet tall. They bought a gaard (farm) at Flovt, a small town straight east of Haderslev, a bit off shore of the Lille Bœlt waters, where fishing was good.” (*) Flovt is located in the parish of Øsby, about ten kilometers east of the city of Haderslev. The parish is bordered on the north by the Haderslev Fjord and on the east by the Lille Bœlt, and consists of small farming and fishing communities. The parish is quite flat, the highest point being Tamdrup Hill (49 meters) which slopes down to the Bœlt and forms the only cliffs in the area. This site has the most impressive view of the Bœlt in all of Slesvig. (See Kongeriget Danmark, J.P. Trap, København, 1930.)

      “The house was in the town and the land was in the form of four or five small strips at various points in the country within a short distance of the town. Each strip was very long and very narrow, in the medieval manner. Crops were rotated something like this: first year, wheat; second year, oats; fifth - sixth years, timothy and clover; done in such a manner that in any one year, one field would have oats, and another wheat, another barley, one or two were for grazing.” (*)

      “Niels remembered fishing on the fjord with his father and brother, threshing grain with a flail, taking refuge from a goat in a large wooden chest with the figure 1829, the date of his father’s birth, painted on the outside. The little farms had names. One was Sandager.” (*)

      In February, 1864, Prussia and Austria attacked Denmark in a dispute over the duchies of Slesvig and Holstein. The king of Denmark had acted as duke of the duchies since 1721, and in 1863, a new Danish constitution was enacted which brought Slesvig under direct control of Denmark. The northern portion of Slesvig was almost entirely Danish, while the southern half was German; Holstein being entirely German. Prussia under Bismark rallied support in the German Confederation for an invasion of Denmark. Bismark invented the province of a united “Schleswig-Holstein” so that opposition in Europe could be quieted with the claim that the province was more German than Danish and wished reunification with the fatherland.

      The duchies fell quickly as the Danish forces were outnumbered by the Prussian and Austrian forces. The entire peninsula of Jylland was occupied within several months. On October 30, 1864, the Treaty of Vienna was proclaimed, in which Denmark renounced all claims to Slesvig and Holstein in return for the German evacuation of Jylland.

      Slesvig was annexed by Prussia and Holstein by Austria. In 1866, Prussia defeated Austria in a war. On August 23, 1866 the Treaty of Prague was concluded between the two. Prussia annexed Holstein and agreed to hold a plebiscite in North Slesvig to determine the ethnic boundary between Denmark and Germany. However, in 1878, Bismark deleted this clause and the aspirations of the Danes were suppressed. (See The Scandinavians in History, S.M. Toyne, chapter thirteen, “Denmark and the Slesvig-Holstein Question.”)

      The Danes in North Slesvig suffered severe persecution from the Germans. “Every kind of pressure was put onto the Danes to make them move out, so that German families could move in. Their horses seemed to wander away; their cattle disappeared mysteriously; they had to hide their valuables, like their silver, in haystacks, and other out of the way places.” (*)

      “The products they raised on the land, had to be sold for lower prices than the German families got for the same thing. Often they were robbed of the money they did get before they got home with it. Niels and his father Andreas told many stories about the battles they had with the Germans about these matters. They had actual fist-fights with them.” (*)

      “The Danes were not allowed to speak Danish nor to show their colors red and white, even in an handkerchief. The schools were taken over by the Germans and the children were forced to learn the German language. The boys were taught to march the goose-step.” (*)

      The family remained at Flovt until about 1879. In that year Detlev reached the age of eighteen, and was required to enlist in the Prussian Army. Refusing to do so, he was imprisoned by the Germans. Later he got out of prison and went to Denmark where he joined the Danish Army. To prevent further service in the Prussian Army by their sons, Marie and Andreas sold for what they could get and moved north to Denmark. Also, the clause calling for a plebiscite in North Slesvig had been deleted in 1878, and many Danes seeing that the situation was not improving, went north to Jylland. “The family was much impoverished by the move. The Germans made sure they did not have much when they left.” (**)

      JUTLAND (JYLLAND): 1879-1884

      The Leerskov family settled at Linnet (now Lindet), in Skœrup Parish, Vejle Amt, where Andreas’ sister Anna Hansen lived. “They bought a good farm with fine soil and good buildings. The buildings were arranged as is usual in Denmark, in an open three-sided square. First, facing north, was a house; then, facing west, was a barn; then, facing north, was a granary. Between the buildings was the open court. The house and granary were of “Bindings werk” (half timber, the real kind, not the kind we see here) and the barn was of brick. But the land was hilly and Niels was called a “Tyske Dreng” (German Boy) in Vinding, where he went to school.” (*)

      “For these reasons, and no doubt, for other reasons, the family looked around for another location. They finally settled on a farm at Hedensted, near Løsning. Niels was against the choice because he thought the land would be poor and sandy. They found him right.” (*)

      “Meanwhile, Detlev had finished his service in the Danish Army and decided to go to America. He went to live with his uncle, Niels Leerskov, who lived at Tahlequah, Indian Territory. Detlev wrote repeatedly for the family to come to America. His brother, Niels, insisted that the family wait until he too had gone over to see how things were in America.” Niels left Denmark in May, 1884. “Because several of his friends were going to Hutchinson, Minnesota and had relatives there, he went with them. He liked Minnesota so well and was so well satisfied, that he sent almost immediately for the family.” (*)

      AMERICA: 1884-1916

      Andreas Nissen Leerskov and Marie Kirstine Hollesen with children Wilhelmine, Søren, Kirstine and Anna, left Københaven for America on July 7, 1884, travelling on the Danish steamer Hekla of the Thingvalla line. They arrived at the port of New York on July 25, 1884 with five pieces of baggage. Castle Gardens was the immigrant processing center at New York at that time. They boarded a train which took them to Hutchinson, Minnesota, where their son Niels had settled two months earlier. They bought a farm near Hutchinson where they lived for some time before moving into the town itself.

      The Leerskovs belonged to the Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church (now Faith Lutheran Church) at Hutchinson. Andreas and Marie with daughter Anna moved to Minneapolis on January 23, 1901. They moved into a house at 2611 East 25th Street, and became members of the Danish Lutheran Church at 2300 26th Avenue South, where Anna was married in 1903.

      Andreas had arthritis and often became inpatient with his grandchildren, telling them “hold anken” or stop complaining and behave. Marie cooked as usual in the Danish style: drying fruits for pies, making blood pudding and head cheese, as well as sweet pastries which were made on her coal stove. She also dried nuts from their trees and made a good fruit salad, according to her granddaughter Evelyn Petersen Zenzen.

      Andreas died of pneumonia on November 13, 1907 at his home. His obituary was published in the Danish language newspaper “Danske Ugebladet” (Danish Weekly) in Minneapolis on November 21, 1907:

      Dødsfald. Onsdag sidste Uge afgik ved Døden her i Byen en trofast dansk Sønderjyde, Andreas Nissen Leerskov, i hans hjem, 2611 25 Str. S. Leerskov var født i Beck, Vonsbœk Sogn, Sønderjylland, 22 Oktober 1829, og blev i 1861 gift med Marie Kjerstine Holdersen fra Stellet. De boede i Østby til 1876, da de flyttede over Grœndsen ind i Nørrejylland, for at deres Sønner ikke skulde blive prøjsiske Soldater. De bosatte sig da i Lindet. Leerskov, der var Landmand, gjorde Tjeneste baade i Treaarskrigen og i Krigen 1864 som Œgtkusk for den danske Arme. Som saadan satte han ofte sit Liv i Vove og hjalp ved mange Lejligheder baade Menige og Officerer, saaledes at Fjenden ikke overrumplede dem. Leerskov som til Amerika i 1883 med sin Familie og bosatte sig i Hutchinson, Minn., hvor han har havt sit hjem den meste Tid siden da. Han var en agtet og asholdt Mand overalt hvor han kom frem, rank og høj og havde en nat mindelig kraftig Konstitution. I o senere Aar led han meget af Gigt og 4 Dage før hans Død ramtes han af Lungebetœndelse. Han døde stille i frejdig Tro paa sin Frelser idet han sagde Farvel ti den Iange Livsbane, som nu endte. Lørdag Efter-middag blev han begravet fra Emanuels Kirke ved Pastor Hansen, og Kisten førtes til Laymans Gravplads. Enke og 5 Børn overlever ham.

      Death. Wednesday last week surrendered with death here in this town the loyal Danish Southern Jutlander, Andreas Nissen Leerskov, in his home, 2611 25 Street So. Leerskov was born in Beck, Vonsbaek Parish, South Jutland, 22 October, 1829, and was in 1861 married with Marie Kjerstine Holdersen from Stellet. They lived in Østby until 1876, when they moved over the border into North Jutland, so that their sons would not be obliged to become Prussian soldiers. They settled then in Lindet. Leerskov, who was a farmer, did service both in the Three Year’s War and in the 1864 War, as a coachman for the Danish army. As such he often risked his life and helped in many occasions both privates and officers, to prevent the enemy from making a surprise attack. Leerskov went to America in 1883 with his family and settled at Hutchinson, Minn., where he has had his home the most time since then. He was an esteemed and popular man everywhere where he went, straight and tall, and had an unusual strong constitution. In later years he suffered much from rheumatism and four days before his death he was overtaken with pneumonia. He died quietly in confident faith in his Savior, as he said farewell to the long course of life which has now ended. Saturday afternoon burial services were held at Emanuel’s Church with Pastor Hansen, and the coffin carried to Layman’s Cemetery. Widow and 5 children survive him.

      After Andreas’ death, Niels had his mother Marie sell the house and he moved her into a small house behind his large home in the Morningside area of Minneapolis. Marie made the best of the situation, calling the place her “lille hus.”

      Marie later lived with her son Søren at Brush, Colorado. She was living there in 1910 when the census was taken. She had returned to Minneapolis by May, 1912 when her granddaughter Laura Larson Bosch took her by train to Kansas City, where another grandchild, Dr. Andrew N. Leerskov, met them and drove them in his car to the home of his father Detlev at Tahlequah, Oklahoma.

      Marie again returned to Minneapolis by late 1913, and the following July, 1914 Niels and his wife Hannah decided to put her in the Old People’s Home of the Church of God at Cottage Grove, Minnesota, on the far south-eastern limits of Saint Paul. The home was nothing more than a home for the poor, but Niels and Hannah were too tight with their money to care for her. Marie lived there nearly two years, until her death on August 1, 1916 caused by “hot weather and extreme old age.” She was buried next to Andreas in Layman’s Cemetery, now called Pioneer and Soldier’s Cemetery, at Minneapolis, Minnesota. It was probably Eleanor Leerskov who later placed a stone to mark their graves.
    • Vejle, Holmans, Skærup, Skjærup By Skjærup Sogn, en Gaard, 13, FT-1880, C7587
      Navn: Alder: Civilstand: Stilling i husstanden: Erhverv: Fødested:
      Andreas Nissen Leerskov 50 Gift Huusfader Gaardeier (Avlsmand) Preusen
      Marie Kirstine Leerskov født Hollesen 35 Gift Hans Hustru (Huusmoder) Preusen
      Ditlev Nissen Leerskov 17 Ugift Er hjemme hos Faderen ved Agerbruget Preusen
      Niels Nissen Leerskov 16 Ugift Er hjemme hos Faderen ved Agerbruget Preusen
      Ane Kirstine Vilhelmine Nissen Leerskov 10 Ugift Deres Barn Preusen
      Søren Nissen Leerskov 7 Ugift Deres Barn Preusen
      Kirstine Nissen Leerskov 3 Ugift Deres Barn Preusen
      Kirstine Hollesen 57 Enke Konens Moder (Aftægtskone) Preusen