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Michael Francis “Mike” DAWES b. 29 Nov 1947 d. 23 Aug 2005 Baqubah, Diyala Province, Iraq: Wade Prater Genealogy Online
 
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Michael Francis “Mike” DAWES

Male 1947 - 2005  (57 years)


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  • Name Michael Francis “Mike” DAWES 
    Born 29 Nov 1947  [1
    Gender Male 
    Died 23 Aug 2005  Baqubah, Diyala Province, Iraq Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Fort Gibson National Cemetery, Fort Gibson, Muskogee Co., Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I5432  Main
    Last Modified 24 Feb 2020 

    Father Daniel Sampson “Sam” DAWES,   b. 21 Apr 1898, Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Apr 1967, Muskogee, Muskogee Co., Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years) 
    Mother Bessie Lee GOURD,   b. 20 Jan 1912, -----, -----, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Feb 2001, Tahlequah, Cherokee Co., Oklahoma* Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years) 
    Family ID F1107  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Living 
    Children 
     1. Living
     2. Living
    Last Modified 24 Feb 2020 
    Family ID F3695  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Iraq casualty lauded as superb law enforcer
      The former Cherokee marshal was in the country as a contract police trainer.

      TAHLEQUAH -- A former Cherokee Nation marshal killed by a suicide bomber Tuesday in Iraq was the kind of law enforcer who never backed down from dangerous conflicts, friends said Wednesday.

      Mike Dawes of Stilwell was killed in downtown Baqubah in the Diyala province north of Baghdad, reports say. He was in the dining area of police headquarters when the bomber walked in and detonated the explosives.

      Dawes was working as a privately contracted police liaison officer for DynCorp International of Irving, Texas, reports say.

      Braving such violent hot spots was nothing new for Dawes. In addition to his career with the Cherokee Nation Marshal Service, he worked in Kosovo several years ago as a peacekeeper under a United Nations contract.

      He also served in Vietnam as a member of the Army's 82nd Airborne Division, authorities said.

      "He was the kind of guy that when you went on a call you did not have to look around," said Pat Ragsdale, a former head of the tribal marshal service and now the director of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. "He was going to be there."

      Funeral services are pending under the direction of Reed-Culver Funeral Home in Tahlequah. Dawes is survived by his wife and four children.

      Dawes was a Tahlequah police officer until Ragsdale hired him for the Cherokee Nation Marshal Service in the early 1990s. He held the job for several years, including the turbulent 1997.

      That was the year when marshals raided then-Cherokee Chief Joe Byrd's headquarters, investigating allegations of misuse of funds, according to reports.

      Byrd fired the marshals, instigated an impeachment of tribal justices and took control of the Cherokee Nation Courthouse.

      Dawes was with Ragsdale and others when they tried to storm the building in an Aug. 13, 1997, melee. Three people were arrested.

      The marshals were later reinstated, and Ragsdale never forgot Dawes' loyalty.

      "He was loyal to the Cherokee Nation and loyal to the Constitution," the BIA director said from Washington, D.C. "He never complained and he never wavered.

      "Mike was a steady, steady person."

      Dawes received the tribe's Medal of Patriotism in 2003 "in recognition of his service to the Cherokee Nation and his efforts to uphold the Cherokee Constitution," according to a statement by Chief Chad Smith.

      "He devoted his entire life to protecting people," Smith said. "It is numbing when we lose someone of his stature in the service of our country."

      Dawes' portrait was included in a Cherokee photographic exhibit shown in 2001 at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington.

      Cherokee County Sheriff Norman Fisher, who was the Tahlequah police chief during Dawes' time on the force, said he was not surprised to see Dawes in such tricky war zones as Kosovo and Iraq.

      "He was a good police officer," Fisher said. "Knowing Mike like I did, he didn't shirk his duties. He wouldn't back off any task."

      Dawes was honored several times during his 18-month stint in Kosovo, reports say. He served with an elite United Nations special operations unit, a tribal report said.

      He once helped arrest an Albanian caught with a hand grenade but moments later was protecting the Albanian from a mob of angry Serbs, reports say.

      "Their commitment to their prisoner was beyond expectations while foregoing their own safety," United Nations Deputy Station Commander Clinton Park said in commending Dawes and other officers at the time.

      "The dangers they faced were clear and their bravery was admirable," Park added.

      Dawes worked for DynCorp helping to train Iraqis as police officers, according to reports. The company is working under a contract with the Department of State.

      Seven other people were killed in the Baqubah bombing. A U.S. soldier and five Iraqis -- four center employees and a police officer -- also died in the strike on the Diyala Provincial Joint Coordination Center, according to news reports.

      Rod Walton 581-8457

      rod.walton@tulsaworld.com
      Tulsa World (OK). Date: August 25, 2005.


      DI Police Liaison Officer Killed in Iraq
      IRVING, TEXAS – August 25, 2005 – Mike Dawes of Stilwell, Oklahoma, an International Police Liaison Officer with DynCorp International, was killed Tuesday by a suicide bomber in Iraq. A second DynCorp International employee was injured in the attack.

      The attack occurred when a suicide bomber walked into a dining facility at the Diyala Province Police Headquarters in downtown Baqubah at about 1:30 p.m. and detonated the explosives.

      Mr. Dawes died at the scene. The injured employee was treated at the scene and then evacuated to the combat support hospital in Balad. His wounds were not life-threatening.

      Nine Iraqi police officers were also reportedly killed in the attack, and the building was severely damaged. Mr. Dawes previously worked at the Tahlequah Police Department and the Cherokee Nations Marshal Service. He had worked in law enforcement for 16 years, and he had completed two civilian police missions with DynCorp International in Kosovo, giving a total of 42 months´ service. He served in the U.S. Army from 1967 to 1969, and one of his sons recently returned from a tour of duty in Iraq with the U.S. military.

      Mr. Dawes is survived by his wife, two sons, and two daughters.

      Police liaison officers in Iraq are responsible for training and mentoring Iraqi police officers under the supervision of the Department of State. DynCorp International has conducted police training with the Department of State in several countries, including Iraq, Afghanistan, Kosovo, and East Timor.

      DynCorp International is a leading professional services and project-management firm serving governments, corporations, and international organizations worldwide. Headquartered in Irving, Texas, it has more than 14,000 employees in some 35 countries. It has its origins in 1946 with the founding of the company subsequently known as Dynalectron Corporation and later as DynCorp. It had revenues of nearly $2 billion in the fiscal year ending March 31, 2005.


      DAWES, Mike, 57. Tahlequah international police liaison officer for DynCorp International. Died Aug. 23 in Baqubah, Iraq. Services 11 a.m. Aug. 31 at Cornerstone Fellowship Church. Reed-Culver Funeral Home, Tahlequah. The Tahlequah Daily Press, Wednesday, August 31, 2005


      Students honor slain Cherokee man
      Cherokee langauge class creates ribbon in memory of Mike Dawes

      Sam Lewin 9/23/2005
      http://www.nativetimes.com

      Every semester Cedric Sunray, an Indian language instructor at
      Tahlequah High School, has his students create a business plan,
      complete with cash projections, in Cherokee.

      The idea is to get the youngsters to use the language in a modern
      setting.

      This year the kids also wanted to do something a little different.

      "They decided they wanted to create a ribbon-it's almost cliché
      because you see them around everywhere and I like things to be
      original-but they wanted to honor him in the Cherokee language,"
      Sunray told the Native American Times.

      "Him" is Mike Dawes of Stilwell, a former Cherokee Nation Marshall
      killed Aug. 23 by a suicide bomber in the Iraqi town of Baqubah. At
      the time Dawes was working as an International Police Liaison Officer
      with DynCorp International, a private security firm based in Texas.
      The firm reported that a suicide bomber walked into a dining facility
      at the Diyala Province Police Headquarters at about 1:30 p.m. and
      detonated the explosives.

      Dawes died at the scene. Nine Iraqi police officers were also killed
      in the attack.

      Dawes had worked in law enforcement for 16 years, and he had
      completed two civilian police missions with DynCorp in Kosovo. A
      veteran, Dawes served in the U.S. Army from 1967 to 1969.

      One of Dawes' sons, Daniel, is in Sunray's class.

      "He was the one to create the idea of the ribbon and bring it to the
      forefront," Sunray said.

      So the class created one hundred of the ribbons, emblazoned with "A
      da lv quo di Di tli Hi"-Cherokee for "Honor Warrior."

      The ribbons have now sold out and the class is creating 100 more. All
      proceeds are going to benefit Dawes widow and children.

      Sunray said that in addition to paying tribute to Dawes, whom he
      calls a "truly honorable gentleman", the ribbons help his students
      keep their Native language relevant and vibrant.

      "We hear all across Indian Country about people using one dialectic
      or another-you know when they aren't speaking the language it doesn't
      matter," he said. "We just want to get them talking."


      Former Marshall Mike Dawes laid to Rest
      By Travis Snell
      Staff Writer
      Cherokee Phoenix
      October 2005
      TAHLEQUAH, Okla. - Mourners gathered Aug. 31 at Cornerstone Fellowship
      Church to pay their respects to former Cherokee Nation tribal marshal and
      citizen Mike Dawes.
      Dawes, 57, was killed by a suicide bomber in Baqubah, Iraq, while
      working for DynCorp International, a Texas firm contracting security
      officers in the region.
      Dawes was acting as a police liaison officer to train Iraqi police
      officers. Officials said Dawes died when the bomber walked into a dining
      facility at the Diyala Province police headquarters in Baqubah and
      detonated explosives.
      He died at the scene and another employee sustained non life-threatening
      injuries. Many at Dawes' funeral said the world felt a little less safe
      without him around to help protect it.
      That's why he's a hero to us today," said Steve Hamby, the pastor who
      presided over Dawes' funeral and burial services. The former marshal was
      laid to rest at Fort Gibson National Cemetery. "The thing about heroes is
      that they're sometimes called upon to make the ultimate sacrifice."
      After growing up in Tahlequah, Dawes spent most of his adult life
      protecting his country, family and friends, Cherokee citizens and people
      around the world.
      He served in the U.S. Army's 82nd Airborne Division from 1967-69 during
      the Vietnam War. He later spent several years as a Tahlequah police
      officer before joining the Cherokee Nation Marshal Service in 1992. He
      left the CNMS in 1998 to become part of the U.N. peacekeeping force sent
      to the war-torn province of Kosovo in 1998. There he helped keep the
      Serbian Army and police from committing atrocities against the Albanian
      people.
      For 18 months, Dawes served with an elite U.N. special operations unit
      throughout Kosovo, including the northwest region of Kosovo called
      Mitrovica.
      Dawes was honored several times during his Kosovo duty, reports state.
      He once helped arrest an Albanian caught with a hand grenade but moments
      later was protecting the Albanian from a mob of angry Serbs, according to
      reports.
      "Their commitment to their prisoner was beyond expectations while
      foregoing their own safety," U.N. Deputy Station Commander Clinton Park
      said in commending Dawes and other officers at the time. "The dangers they
      faced were clear and their bravery was admirable."
      Cherokee County Sheriff Norman Fisher, who was the police chief during
      Dawes' time on Tahlequah Police Department, said he wasn't shocked to know
      Dawes was in war zones such as Kosovo and Iraq. "He was a good police
      officer. Knowing Mike like I did, he didn't shirk his duties. He wouldn't
      back off any task."
      Locally, Dawes will be remembered as one of the marshals who was fired
      during the Constitutional Crisis of the late 1990s. Under the leadership
      of then-CNMS
      Director Pat Ragsdale, who is now the Bureau of Indian Affairs Director,
      Dawes served as a marshal when former Principal Chief Joe Byrd fired the
      unit after marshals executed a court order to copy administrative records
      concerning spending of the tribe's money in 1997.
      He and the fired marshals later attempted to retake the Cherokee Nation
      Courthouse after Byrd's newly hired marshals overtook it. Dawes and the
      other marshals were later reinstated.
      Ragsdale, who traveled from Washington, D.C., to attend the funeral,
      praised Dawes for his loyalty and his devotion to defending freedom around
      the world.
      "He was a citizen of the world," Ragsdale said. "He was the kind of guy
      that when you went on a call you did not have to look around. He was going
      to be there." Principal Chief Chad Smith, who rewarded Dawes' loyalty with
      a Medal of Patriotism in 2003, also spoke fondly of Dawes.
      "It's so rare for somebody to be so solid," Smith said. "Most people go
      through life and don't get what's of value. He was very special. He
      devoted his entire life to protecting people. It is numbing when we lose
      someone of his stature in the service of our country."
      But it wasn't his military and police career that was spotlighted at his
      funeral as mourners saw dozens of pictures from graduations, picnics and
      other family outings.
      "He was a true gentleman," Dist. 1 Tribal Councilor Bill John Baker said.
      "Devotion and dedication - that was his life. That encapsulated who Mike
      Dawes was."
      Dawes leaves behind his wife of 28 years, Deretha, and four children
      that includes a son who recently returned from a military tour of duty in
      Iraq.
      Travis Snell, (918) 456-0671, ext. 2358
      tsnell@cherokee.org

  • Sources 
    1. [S44] .